Wrongful Foreclosure: Prejudice Results from the Foreclosure of a Void Assignment

  In Yvanova v. New Century Mortgage Corp the California Supreme Court held that in a case where a homeowner alleges a nonjudicial foreclosure sale was wrongful because of a void assignment, the homeowner has standing to sue for wrongful foreclosure.

  In Sciarratta v. U.S. Bank National Association the question of “prejudice” left open in Yvanova was decided. Where a homeowner alleges foreclosure by one with no right to do so, do such allegations alone establish the requisite prejudice or harm necessary to state a cause of action for wrongful foreclosure?  Or instead, to adequately plead prejudice, does the plaintiff-homeowner have to allege the wrongful foreclosure interfered with his or her ability to pay on the debt, or lead to a foreclosure that would not have otherwise occurred?  Continue reading

Unlawful Detainer: Personal Service of Notice to Quit Must Be Attempted; Post Foreclosure Plaintiff Must Prove Duly Perfected Title

  In an unusual move, the California Supreme Court ordered publication of an opinion issued by the Santa Clara County Superior Court, Appellate Division, in an limited jurisdiction unlawful detainer case: Bank of New York Mellon v. Preciado. The decision specified two errors in the unlawful detainer proceedings: 1) the proofs of service of the 3-day notice failed to show that personal service was attempted; 2) the post foreclosure plaintiff failed to prove its title was duly perfected. Each defect required reversal of the judgment and a new and different judgment in favor of defendants. Continue reading

Wrongful Foreclosure: 5 Insufficient Factual Allegations

  Rossberg v. Bank of America is a case about factual allegations which will not win the day in a suit to enjoin a nonjudicial foreclosure sale. The Rossbergs attempted to allege defects sufficient to invalidate the recorded Notice of Default and sought to enjoin the foreclosure sale of their residence. The take-a-ways: Continue reading

Wrongful Foreclosure; Temporary Loan Modification; Void Sale: Tender Not Required

  In Chavez v. Indymac Mortgage Services the court allowed a wrongful foreclosure case to proceed where the borrower complied with all the terms of the temporary loan modification and timely signed and returned the loan modification agreement. Continue reading

Nonjudicial Foreclosure: Preemptive Actions Dissallowed

  Once again a Court of Appeals affirms the trial court’s ruling sustaining a demurrer without leave to amend of a homeowners’ complaint which challenged the MERS registration system and the assignment of the underlying note by MERS. Continue reading

Antideficiency Protections Under 580b, 580d, and 580e Amended and Clarified

  Antideficiency protections have been clarified by July 2013 legislation amending Code of Civil Procedure sections 580b and 580d. SB 426 amends those sections and clearly provides that the prohibitions contained in sections 580b and 580d include collecting or even owing a deficiency. The amendment further clarifies that the prohibition extends only to the borrower and the borrower’s non-encumbered assets — not to 1) guarantors, pledgors, or other sureties; or, 2) that might be satisfied from other collateral pledged to secure the obligation. Continue reading

Borrower May Challenge Securitized Trust’s Ownership

  The Fifth Appellate District holds in Glaski v. Bank of America that a borrower may challenge a securitized trust’s claim to ownership of the deed of trust by alleging “the attempts to transfer the deed of trust to the securitized trust (which was formed under New York law) occurred after the trust’s closing date. Transfers that violate the terms of the trust instrument are void under New York law, and borrowers have standing to challenge void assignments of their loans even though they are not a party to, or a third party beneficiary of, the assignment agreement.” Continue reading

580b Purchase Money Antideficiency Protection Applies to Short Sales

  In a case of first impression, the Fourth Appellate District in Coker v. JP Morgan Chase Bank, holds that the antideficiency protections of Code of Civil Procedure section 580b apply to any loan used to purchase residential real property, commonly referred to as a “purchase money loan,” regardless of the mode of sale. Continue reading

Davis-Stirling: Foreclosure Notice Requirements are Strictly Construed

  The Sixth Appellate District holds that the pre-foreclosure notice requirements of the Davis-Stirling Common Interest Development Act must be strictly construed to create a valid lien. Only valid liens may be recorded and subsequently foreclosed by the association. The case is Diamond v. Superior Court (Casa Del Valle Homeowners Association). The notice and procedural requirements can be found in Civil Code sections 1367.1 and 1367.4 and are summarized here.  Continue reading

Failure to Provide Notice of Redemption Rights May Void HOA’s Nonjudicial Foreclosure

  In Multani v. Witkin & Neal [See, also Multani v. Witkin & Neal Order Modifying Opinion (No Change in Judgment)] the Court of Appeal was presented with a question of first impression. Does a homeowner’s association’s failure to comply with the requirements of Code of Civil Procedure section 729.050, i.e., the associations failure to notify the owner of its redemption rights, sufficiently prejudiced an owner such that the owner can state a cause of action to set aside the foreclosure sale? Continue reading